Friday, February 7, 2020

Carbohydrate Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words

Carbohydrate - Essay Example The apparent simplicity of these processes proved deceptive. The number of chemically definable units increased with accelerated speed from the beginning of the nineteenth century. Toward its end, the very multiplicity which sometimes became confusing made it possible to solve many problems. The genius of the great "natural philosophers" of earlier times had its successors in the genius of chemists who constructed a new unity by fitting together separate pieces of special experience. At first, however, the organismic products had to be taken apart and transferred from a biological system to that of elements and molecules. In 1827 William Prout (1785- 1850) distinguished between three groups of food materials: fats, proteins, and sugars. From the combustion of sugars which he carried out he concluded that sugars are related to starch and characterized by containing oxygen and hydrogen in the proportions in which these elements are present in water. They are hydrates of carbon, or carbohydrates. The conversion of starch into the sugar found in grape juice (glucose) was carried out by Gottlieb Sigismund Kirchhoff, a German pharmacist in Russia, in two ways: by heating with dilute sulfuric acid or by digesting with the "gluten" of malt (1811, 1814). Glucose was also obtained by the action of certain specific plant extracts on substances like amygdaline or salicin. Latirent proposed to call these substances "glucosamides" (1852) which Gerhardt simplified to "glycosides." They are split by enzymes into glucose and such complex materials as the nitrile of benzaldehyde (Foster-Powell, K., Brand Miller, 1995). When Alexander Butlerow (1828- 1886, Kasan) subjected a new substance, which was later found to be formaldehyde, to a digestion with limewater, he obtained (1861) "the first example of the synthetic production of a substance which behaves like a sugar." Baeyer explained this reaction (1870) as starting from a hydrate of formaldehyde, CH 2 ((OH) 2, and consisting of a combination of six such molecules with removal of six molecules of water. The sugar thus had the formula COH(C [OH] H) 4.CH 2 0H. This speculation used the results of an investigation of mannit, an alcohol obtained from manna. Berthelot, as a sequence of his work on the tribasic alcohol glycerine, recognized mannit as a hexabasic alcohol 1860); its reduction to the hydrocarbon hexane, by means of hydroiodic acid, proved the arrangement of the carbon atoms in a straight chain. This proof, in turn, was possible only because of the comparison of this hexane with other hydrocarbons. A. Wurtz applied his findings of aldehyde condensations, in which only two aldehyde molecules were involved, to the problem of the constitution of glucose. Oxidations to sugar acids and reduction to mannit were further helps in solving the problem. The chemical constitution of fructose, which is combined with glucose in cane sugar (sucrose), could be interpreted (1880) from the acids obtained by oxidizing the addition compound with hydrocyanic acid (Foster-Powell, Miller, 1995). Cellulose also belongs to the group of carbohydrates, since the addition of molecular water, under the influence of strong sulfuric acid, converts it into glucose (Braconnot, 1819). Wood contains a large proportion of cellulose and lignin. The two call be separated, according to Anselme Payen ( 1795- 1871,

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Molly Dinton Essay Example for Free

Molly Dinton Essay I dont know where documentary is going, but at the moment it is fast becoming a soap opera in order to keep its place in the schedules Molly Dinton. Dinton believes that the documentary genre is changing in order to survive. This evolution of the genre could be justified, and enables the diverse genre to still be able to attain fixtures on the British television broadcasting stations. The statement of the documentary fast becoming a soap opera, can to some extent be supported. Currently on British television, there has been a swarm of reality TV programmes and Docu- soaps, which can be seen as a polluted hybrid of the documentary genre. These programmes are noted as successful in attracting an audience, therefore, the TV institutions are more likely to exploit these wining formulas of the genre and schedule the newer, more popular American format of documentary rather than the traditional documentary formula that aims to construct a social criticism and catalyse change, which often has a stigma of smelling of dust and boredom (Alberto Cavalcanti). Institutions are able to have a minimal risk of financial failure with docu- soaps and reality TV programmes, because as well having a high rating of audience consumption, the programmes are financially very cheap to produce. This is because the hybrid forms do not generally have professional actors but consist of real people. Also the programmes are often filmed in cheap locations over a relatively short period of time compared with Nick Broomfields Aileen- The Life and Death of a Serial Killer. In this recent documentary (2003) Broomfield worked in America for multiple months, which would have been extremely costly. Paul Hanmann, head of BBC Documentary features, says that a reality programme is three times cheaper as comparable light entertainment. Or take for example, Martin Bashirs The Michael Jackson Story, where by Bashir followed Michael Jackson from country to country over a period of a year, making a very costly production for ITV. In this investigative documentary, it too can also be noted as conforming to the new soap opera style of documentary, as Bashir chose to present to the nation the version that sensationalised the Jackson story in a negative light creating a spin off of conversation for a duration after. Bashir, like a soap opera director, chose to present the narrative version of the documentary that would create the most dramatic effect or shock for the audience. TV executives are more keen on scheduling the popular forms of the documentary genre and make the values of the programme centre on entertainment, as they feel entertainment is more appealing to the audience than a documentary that exits on a moral and ethical dimension. The intertextuality of the Docu- Soaps such as Vet School, The Cruise and Driving school, attract huge viewing ratings. For example Driving school had a 12. 5 million audience. The Docu- soap resembles the conventional fly on the wall antecedents, but like a Soap Opera, the genre prioritises audience entertainment over social commentary, and focuses on characters and their personalities, rather than on their social roles or professions. Characters are picked for their personalities, to ensure interesting viewing and strike a parallel with the Soap Operas, in that the characters are known on a first name basis to build up a relationship between audience and screen characters. Likewise, the episodes are strongly based on the drive of the narrative structure, to make more entertaining, simplistic and more story- like for the audience to follow and enjoy. Yet another demonstration of documentaries becoming a soap opera is with channel 4s Thatll teach them. In this series, teenagers of today were seemingly sent back in time to be educated in the 1950s. The programme is then followed up, several months later with, That taught em, making the series like a soap opera because the channel are adding to the original narrative, in order to get a greater knowledge of the teenagers. Reality TV combines the commercial success of tabloid content with a public service mode of address. The genre includes The Salon, Big Brother, Police Camera Action and Wife Swap, which are all hugely popular. Big Brother had a staggering 45, 000 people audition to be on the programme. These programmes are essentially very alike in comparison to Soap Operas. Often in reality TV, contrasting personalities are deliberately selected or an arisen conflict sensationalised; also many of the programmes are edited in order to capture comedy moments. Moreover in the Docu- Soap Driving School, there is evidence to suggest that many of the sequences, or body language/ facial expressions in the programme were faked in order to create further dramatic effect. Through sensationalising episodes, these programmes are able to compete with the story lines of many soaps, and attract viewers who enjoy much of the dramatisation that occurs in the soap operas. It also serves to entertain the audience. Reality TV is very much like many soaps. This is achieved by using editing. The Directors are able to create a persona or character of the participants, that the audience will either love or loathe, through selecting which footage to air and which to discard. With CCTV footage in Police Camera Action and 24/7 actuality footage of the constructed documentary, Big Brother, the audience is able to involve themselves in dramatic irony and acquire a greater knowledge of the characters and their situations, like we are also able to do through watching soaps. As McCann states it often turns us into Peeping Toms, which obviously appeals to a sector of society. There is however, evidence to suggest that many documentaries, which adopt the objective of catalysing change in the law or the dominant ideology and use film verite, are also still scheduled on British TV. For example, during November of each year, war documentaries will be broadcasted for Remembrance Day, and in the month of August, documentaries on Princess Diana and her death will be documented, to heighten the audiences level of awareness surrounding her suspicious death. These documentaries try to offer several new pieces of information discovered that are based on fact and not fiction. Experts, eyewitnesses, and official civil servants provide the evidence for the programme, giving it credibility. The documentary serves to criticise, the way in which the investigation was run, but also to cause the audience to change their previously held opinion on the subject, and to take on and believe the message given by the text. Occasionally other documentaries by famous documentarians are scheduled, such as Nick Broomfields Biggie and Tupac, (channel 4 2003), where Broomfield exposes the maze of obstacles and corruption complicating the investigation of the unsolved murders of the rap stars. Also, it is evident that many nature documentaries are shown on channel five, but not at peak times, which docu- soaps and reality TV are aired. In addition to this there is evidence to suggest that not all documentaries have to become soap operas in order to keep its place in the soap operas. This point can be clearly illustrated with the co- production by the BBC and Discovery Channel in their creation of Walking with Dinosaurs. The documentary achieved huge success and was stated as being the biggest thing on TV in 160 million years. With the aid of computer graphics, the programme portrayed to the audience at peak times of scheduling, a factual account of how dinosaurs lived, adapted into the different time periods, and eventually became extinct. There are also niche channels on Digital or Sky channels, such as Discovery, History, and the Learning channel, all of which schedule films solely from the documentary genre. These channels have high ratings and status, but are not available to everyone. In conclusion, I feel that Molly Dinton was justified in stating that the documentary is fast becoming a soap opera in order to keep its place in the schedules. This is mainly because the mass audience prefer docu- soaps and reality TV, which are closely related to soap operas. This is because these factions of the documentary genre entertain, and cause diversion and escapism for the audience, who are easily able to relax in their leisure time and watch the light- entertainment programmes. They are not presented with a programme that requires the mind to work too hard after a draining day. The broadcasting institutions generally broadcast, what is demanded from the public and what is financially better for their business, making the way clear for further reality shows that resemble the soaps to be produced. Perhaps the film verite documentaries are not as popular as the hybrid genres because in general they require a higher intellect/ socio- economic group to follow the programme or be interested in the issues investigated. This form of documentary perhaps has outlived its usefulness and no longer has a very clear significance. The vast docu- soaps and reality television programmes are scheduled at peak times, because they appeal to a wider audience where as the occasional documentary is scheduled mainly in the late eve. Therefore it is true that documentaries are fast becoming soap operas in order to survive.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

How can Gatsby be called Great Essay -- F. Scott Fitzgerald Great Gats

The title of F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel ‘The Great Gatsby’ can be seen as incredibly ironic: not only can the ‘greatness’ of the eponymous character be vehemently contested, he is not even named ‘Gatsby’. In fact, he is a criminal, James Gatz, who, although he appears to be an epitome of the idealistic American Dream, having grown from an impoverished childhood into a life of excess and splendour, he has obtained everything through crime and corruption. Indeed, it has been said that ‘The Great Gatsby’ is â€Å"a parable of disenchantment with the ‘American Dream’† , and it is, for the American Dream is the idea that â€Å"through hard work, courage and determination, one could achieve prosperity.† James Gatz did not obtain his prosperous lifestyle through â€Å"hard work†, but rather through felony. Of course, it may seem that he ‘worked hard’ for it, and there is no disputing hi s determination and perhaps even his courage, but the â€Å"hard work† on which the American Dream is based is not the work of criminals. Of course, we cannot deny that Gatsby has achieved a great deal in his lifetime, all, apparently, in the name of love. Indeed the narrator of the story, Nick Carraway, describes Gatsby as having â€Å"an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person†, and this forms the basis of his opening argument for the greatness of Gatsby. We must, however, examine the reliability of the narrator. Nick says himself that he is â€Å"inclined to reserve all judgement†, but then quickly goes on to say how â€Å"it has a limit†, that he cannot reserve judgement on everyone, and also that Gatsby was â€Å"exempt from my reaction†, following this with how Gatsby â€Å"represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn†,... ...l of Daisy, either. After all, Nick himself says that â€Å"Dishonesty in a woman is a thing you never blame deeply†, and one can assume that this would also be true for Daisy: Wilson would not have shot Daisy as he does Gatsby: it would appear that his â€Å"romantic readiness† was eventually the cause of his murder. The fact that he was killed by Wilson is deeply ironic: the underdog, the only poor character we see in the novel, running a â€Å"bare†, â€Å"whitewashed† garage under the god-like eyes of â€Å"Doctor T. J Eckleburg†, kills the prosperous, rich, idealistic hero, showing not only the â€Å"disenchantment of the ‘American Dream’†, but also that there really is no place for Jay Gatsbys in the world: the qualities which Nick perceives as â€Å"great† slowly pave the way for his defeat. Was Gatsby â€Å"great†? No, he was simply naively idealistic in a society completely deficient in morality. How can Gatsby be called Great Essay -- F. Scott Fitzgerald Great Gats The title of F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel ‘The Great Gatsby’ can be seen as incredibly ironic: not only can the ‘greatness’ of the eponymous character be vehemently contested, he is not even named ‘Gatsby’. In fact, he is a criminal, James Gatz, who, although he appears to be an epitome of the idealistic American Dream, having grown from an impoverished childhood into a life of excess and splendour, he has obtained everything through crime and corruption. Indeed, it has been said that ‘The Great Gatsby’ is â€Å"a parable of disenchantment with the ‘American Dream’† , and it is, for the American Dream is the idea that â€Å"through hard work, courage and determination, one could achieve prosperity.† James Gatz did not obtain his prosperous lifestyle through â€Å"hard work†, but rather through felony. Of course, it may seem that he ‘worked hard’ for it, and there is no disputing hi s determination and perhaps even his courage, but the â€Å"hard work† on which the American Dream is based is not the work of criminals. Of course, we cannot deny that Gatsby has achieved a great deal in his lifetime, all, apparently, in the name of love. Indeed the narrator of the story, Nick Carraway, describes Gatsby as having â€Å"an extraordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person†, and this forms the basis of his opening argument for the greatness of Gatsby. We must, however, examine the reliability of the narrator. Nick says himself that he is â€Å"inclined to reserve all judgement†, but then quickly goes on to say how â€Å"it has a limit†, that he cannot reserve judgement on everyone, and also that Gatsby was â€Å"exempt from my reaction†, following this with how Gatsby â€Å"represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn†,... ...l of Daisy, either. After all, Nick himself says that â€Å"Dishonesty in a woman is a thing you never blame deeply†, and one can assume that this would also be true for Daisy: Wilson would not have shot Daisy as he does Gatsby: it would appear that his â€Å"romantic readiness† was eventually the cause of his murder. The fact that he was killed by Wilson is deeply ironic: the underdog, the only poor character we see in the novel, running a â€Å"bare†, â€Å"whitewashed† garage under the god-like eyes of â€Å"Doctor T. J Eckleburg†, kills the prosperous, rich, idealistic hero, showing not only the â€Å"disenchantment of the ‘American Dream’†, but also that there really is no place for Jay Gatsbys in the world: the qualities which Nick perceives as â€Å"great† slowly pave the way for his defeat. Was Gatsby â€Å"great†? No, he was simply naively idealistic in a society completely deficient in morality.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Music and Dance Essay

Filipinos are known as great musicians worldwide. This is seen in their dedication and intense love for music. Early Filipinos already developed their own music through their endemic songs and instruments. The Magellan expedition in 1521, witnessed among the Cebuanos instruments of timbale, and cymbal and other forms of drums. The most popular music instrument found in the country is the kudyapi a metal stringed instrument shaped like a boat, Tingguian nose flute called kalalen, the Muslim xylophone called kulintang. Negritos of Bataan and Zambales have the musical instrument called ban, the Visayans had a guitar looking which they called gangsa and the toltogan, a bamboo drum. Aside from instruments, our ancestors also expressed themselves through their songs with dance like; tagumpay, Tagalog sog of victory, Mang-ay-uweng, an Igorot’s labor song, Kinnallogong which is an Ilocano dance of a man facing a woman, tudub a harvest song together with dandansuy, balitaw the two popular song and dance in Agusan, Other Philippine ethnic dances are the following; Bonog- Cordillera dance portraying hunting, Salisid- Cordillera courtship dance, Palok- cordillera tribal dance, Idudu- Cordillera tribal dance which is a common among Itneg or Tinguian society, Lumagen- Kalinga traditional thanksgiving dance, Bendayan- Benguet dance commemorating the arrival of the headhunters and Binaylan- Agusan ritual dance which originated from the Bagobo tribe. Dressing and Ornamentation The ancient Filipinos have their own attire and their own fashion. The men in the barangay society wore the kanggan, described as a black or blue collarless, short-sleeve jacket. They also wore a bahag a strip of cloth wrapped around their heads was also used which is called putong. They also had jewels such as pendant, gold necklaces, gold teeth, gold armlets that were called kalombigas and gold anklets filled with agates, carnelian and other gems. The women had their own way of dressing themselves same as the men. They wore wide-sleeve jacket called baro or camisa, in their lower part they wore a skirt, a piece of colored cloth, which they called as tapis or saya by the Tagalog and Patadyong by the Visayans. Women wore jewelry consisted of gold necklace,  gold bracelets, large gold earrings and gold rings and teeth. In Visayans, the most tattooed Filipinos settled; they developed a social representation through body marks of various designs representing animals, flowers and geometric representations. There were two reasons: first, to enhance their physical body beauty, and second, for men to show their war records, the more enemy a warrior killed in the battle, the more tattoo was inched in his body. The women were less tattooed than men. When the Spaniards came to Visayas and upon seeing such people they called pintados r painted people, they called the island as Las Islas Pintados or Island of Painted People. A Cat Disease A disease that causes chronic gastrological disorders, IBD, is envisioned in a spectrum of severities. Cats can vomit heavily, and suffer from continuous diarrhea. Reasons for the disease are yet unknown. Bacterial infections, gastrological irritation, lack of vitamins are often quoted as factors contributing to the development of the disease. Veterinarians, treating IBD in cats, usually prescribe medicine and advice on the dietary management as well as make surgical choices. If untreated, IBD, can be fatal for cats. Research – conducted mostly by pet owners – shows that a cat’s diet can be critical. Further research will include inspection of several vaccines. So far, grain-free, raw meat diet has already proved to be largely beneficial. The Meteor Show The much advertised meteor show this summer was a memory ot behold. The air was crisp and cool. I did not even feel a hint of a breeze  on my skin as I lie on my back in the darkness. The warm temperature of the water against the cooler air created a drifting airy fog that whispered over the lake. Darkness enveloped the sky as only a slight curve of the moon shone in the night; consequently, this made the perfect stage for the breathtaking view of twinkling stars. In the still of the night many galaxies glittered from the depths of the sky as I felt hypnotically drawn into the mesmorizing show above me. Broad irregular bands of light from the Milky Way stretched across the sky while the big and little dipper shined brightly. As predicted, the meteor show began with various sized meteors cascading to the earth’s atmosphere about every fifteen to thirty seconds. Shots of light, followed by orange and white mist, describes the presence of the meteors. The panoramic view made it possible to witness several meteors at a time while marveling at each one. An event like this may only happen once in a lifetime, so I will cherish this moment and it will remain as one of my fondest memories. My First Time In The Emergency Room I went to the Emergency Room for the first time when I was thirteen years old. It all came about when I was skateboarding in front of my grandma’s house and I tried to do a trick. I almost pulled it of, but I messed it up in the end and headed to the ground with my hands down. My right wrist was twisted the wrong way in the air when I landed hard on the ground, it just broke it. At first it did not hurt at all, but when I looked down at my warped and twisted wrist , all of a sudden excruciating pain rushed through my wrist and I came unglued. Rolling around on the ground yelling and cussing in pain, my parents saw what happened and came running to my aid. My dad started moving it around saying, â€Å"it’s not broken,† as my mom was saying over and over again we need to go to the emergency room to get the real diiagnosis. After about fifteen minutes of yelling and screaming, I finally got up and held my wrist as I walked to the car. The whole way to the ER the pain got worse and worse. Later I foound out the  increase in pain was due to massive swelling against the broken bone. I had to sit in the waiting room for almost and hour which seemed loke forever. After waiting impatiently, I finally got into the doctor’s office where I got an X-Ray and found out my wrist was truley broken.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Sixth Extinction By Elizabeth Kolbert - 1621 Words

In the book The Sixth Extinction written by Elizabeth Kolbert there are a lot of examples that are going on in the world today and also examples of things that started when the first human being was around. This book talks about how we are in the sixth mass extinction, and that is caused by humans. Overall the book goes chapter by chapter and talks about the different mass extinctions there have been, and how they were caused, but also the book talks about different species that have gone extinct and the reasons why. For example the book talks about golden frogs that are located in Panama and how they were seen everywhere located in El Valle de Anton, but they suddenly started disappearing. They were disappearing because of a chytrid fungis cause by humans, when humans travel they were bring this fungis to different places, this ended up killing the frogs (Chapter 1, Kolbert). That is just one example, but throughout the book Kolbert talks about different extinctions like this a nd what caused them. There are thirteen chapters in book The Sixth Extinction, and each one represents something different as the chapters are leading to the end where she points out that there could be hope. The first chapter in the book is called the Sixth Extinction and this chapter mainly talks about frogs and that is because they have been around longer than any other species some say. Frogs have been around for around 400 million years at least that is when they started crawling out ofShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of Elizabeth Kolberts The Sixth Extinction1575 Words   |  7 Pagespushing other species to extinction, humanity is busy sawing off the limb on which it perches† (The Sixth Extinction, 268). This powerful quote, by Stanford ecologist Paul Ehrlich, accurately sums up the main message conveyed in Elizabeth Kolbert’s most recent and most successful book, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. Elizabeth Kolbert is an experienced journalist and author who is currently working as a â€Å"staff writer at The New Yorker.† While Elizabeth Kolbert has written on a varietyRead MoreThe Extinction : Humans Are Causing The Next Major Extinction Essay1190 Words   |  5 PagesHolocene Extinction; How Humans Are Causing the Next Major Extinction Since before the industrial evolutions humans have been pumping green house gasses—carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons— into the atmosphere however, it wasn’t until recently that the amounts being produced are shoving the Earth into a sixth extinction. While the causes of this upcoming extinction are constantly debated on it has earned itself the name Holocene extinction. This name isRead MoreThe Sixth Extinction Reflection1065 Words   |  5 PagesSummer Reading Reflection I read The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert over this summer. It was a thoughtful book that made me more aware of mother nature as well as the declining environmental health. Basically, the author handled its large, weighty ideas by comparing the current environmental issues with the past five major episodes of mass extinction. Nowadays, the world’s undergoing a sixth mass extinction period, with humans as the driving factor. In short, industrialization and globalizationRead MoreThe Death Of The Moth And The Sixth Extinction?1647 Words   |  7 Pagesto sink back to earth, and settle amongst the branches once more. Picking decomposing bats off of the ground while amidst giant icicles, some with dead flittermice trapped half-within. Virginia Woolf’s â€Å"The Death of the Moth† and Elizabeth Kolbert’s â€Å"The Sixth Extinction?† both present the common theme of the death of animals. Specifically, they share the use of the presentation of the d eath of animals, and vivid imagery to accompany it. There are many differences between the two essays, especiallyRead MoreThe Fourth Extinction By Elizabeth Kolbert1477 Words   |  6 Pageswe are doing now will effect us later. As humans are routines in our lives can bring us harm, and within time a we may become the sixth extinction. I believe we threaten human existence as a species and it can eventually lead to destroying our own comfortable lives we have created for ourselves. In the beginning of the book â€Å"The Sixth Extinction† by Elizabeth Kolbert, she mentions a species of a frog that is going extinct because of a fungus that has been brought over by humans and has been spreadRead MoreThe Problem Of Shrinking Diversity881 Words   |  4 Pagesyears on Earth, there has been five mass extinctions which succeeded in wiping out ninety-five percent of the planets species. Some experts believe that we are on the verge of the sixth mass extinction. For example, journalist Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction, believes that humans are â€Å"living in a time of very, very elevated extinction rates, on the order that you would see in a mass extinction.† The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment backs Kolbert claim. More than a thousand experts inRead MoreThe Fourth Extinction : An Unnatural History By Elizabeth Kolbert1112 Words   |  5 Pagesfive major mass extinction on earth triggered by a distinguishable event, but in The Sixth Ex tinction: An Unnatural History, Elizabeth Kolbert writes of the narrative of the sixth extinction caused directly by human impact. The book identifies the effects of human activity on how, over humans history on earth, the natural world has been affected. Every environmental impact stems into three basic groups of global problems to nature: Pollution, Habitat loss and Invasive Species. Kolbert explains thatRead MoreThe Destruction Of The World1585 Words   |  7 Pages By inhabiting every corner of the planet, razing forests, and burning fossil fuels, people are changing the world so fast that many other species can t cope(Kolbert 1). This statement tells of a bitter truth that has affected the world since the advent of the evolved mankind, through various self-serving activities such as logging, mining, burning fossil fuels and continuously polluting both land and water. People have ensured through this and other wreckless means that other species that inhabitRead MoreMass Extin ction1421 Words   |  6 PagesExtinction is the end of an organism or group of taxa.   Extinctions occur when a species becomes unfit for survival in its natural habitat usually to be replaced by another, better-suited species. An organism becomes ill-suited for survival because its environment is changed or because its relationship to other organisms is altered as stated from Credo Reference. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of that particular species. Mass extinctions, howeverRead MoreJohnson s Seagrass And Its Effects1370 Words   |  6 Pagesfunding for conservation efforts than seagrasses do. It is alarming how quickly ecosystems are being depleted and how fast species are going extinct. If the damage done to Johnson’s seagrass is not reversed or stopped, will it lead to a sixth extinction Elizabeth Kolbert speaks of, or will it have detrimental effects on generations to come? These are questions that more peopl e need to keep in mind when they throw a can on the side of the road or dump pollutants into the ocean.

Friday, December 27, 2019

The Controversy Of The Salem Witch Trials Essay - 1548 Words

There is much one can learn about this tragic smear in our history as the United States of America. The Salem Witch Trials have been sensationalized as of late, becoming a popular show, and an event that many movies have been made of. Without doing the proper research, one would think that the trials were more violent than it became. There were no witches burning at the stake, or daily hangings, or drownings, but people of the time were frightened nonetheless. The acts of just a few key people drove a whole town to hysteria, and fear. Throughout the trials over a hundred people were accused of witchcraft, and nineteen people were executed solely based on the claims of others that they were using the Devil’s Magic, many without any evidence The fingers of two little girls, driven by the urging of one powerful man created a butterfly effect that caused a wake of destruction within the walls of Salem. It can be shown through research that the Reverend Samuel Parris was the drivin g force behind the hysteria that the townspeople of Salem were subjected to. The Salem Witch Trials began in the year 1692 and concluded in 1693, in the colony of Salem, Massachusetts. The start of the trials began in the aftermath of King William’s War when refugees were funneled down into Salem creating a strain on the people and the economy in the town. This helped to spread the belief that all of the problems they were facing was the work of the devil. The Reverend Parris used the church of SalemShow MoreRelatedThe Controversy Of The Salem Witch Trials1380 Words   |  6 PagesThe Salem witchcraft hysteria started because of personal jealousies, it targeted those who went against puritan beliefs, and it was an explanation of all the weird things happening. The events which led to the Witch Trials actually occurred in what is now the town of Danvers, then a parish of Salem Town, known as Salem Village. Launching the hysteria was the bizarre, seemingly inexplicable behavior of two young girls; the daughter, Betty, and the niece, Abigail Williams, of the Salem VillageRead MoreThe Controversy Of The Salem Witch Trials Essay1555 Words   |  7 Pages The Salem Witch Trials have been sensationalized as of late, becoming a highly popular television show, and an event that many movies have been loosely based upon. Without doing the proper research, one would think that the trials were more violent than they became. There were no witches burning at the stake, or daily hangings, or drownings, but people of the time were frightened nonetheless. The acts of just a few key people drove a whole town to hysteria and fear. Throughout the trials over aRead MoreThe Controversy Of The Salem Witch Trials Essay1557 Words   |  7 Pagesan outbre ak of hysteria began in Salem, Massachusetts. Beginning with eight young girls accused of being possessed with the devil, marked the beginning of the Salem Witch Trials. The vast majority of those who were accused of witch craft were people who attempted to turn against Puritan teachings, cultural and economic way of life. The hysteria was the effect of the strict teachings of the puritan lifestyle many were no longer following. The Salem witch trials were ultimately a matter to purge theRead MoreRed Scare And The Crucible Comparison Essay1008 Words   |  5 PagesRed Scare and The Salem Witch Trials were both events that left a mark in American history. The Red Scare began in 1917 and took place across the United States. The Red Scare was known as the widespread promotion of anti-communism. The Salem Witch Trials began in 1692 and took place in Salem, Massachusetts. The Salem Witch Trials were various court hearings and prosecutions of people in Salem accused of Witchcraft. Arthu r Miller wrote The Crucible, a play about The Salem Witch Trials, to send a messageRead MoreThe Crucible And Salem Witch Trials Similarities790 Words   |  4 Pages2017 Salem Witch Trials and The McCarthy Era The United States of America is filled with many historic events, enriching its history. Many events that occur are compared to past events in our history. In particular, the McCarthy Era in the 1950’s was compared to the Salem Witch Trials which occurred in 1692. This correlation was first made by Arthur Miller who wrote the play â€Å"The Crucible†. He connected the time period of McCarthy to where there was a hunt for communists, to the Salem Witch TrialsRead MoreEssay on Salem Witch Trials Of 16921061 Words   |  5 PagesThe Salem Witch Trials of 1692 In colonial Massachusetts between February of 1692 and May of 1963 over one hundred and fifty people were arrested and imprisoned for the capital felony of witchcraft. Trials were held in Salem Village, Ipswich, Andover and Salem Town of Essex County of Massachusetts, but accusations of witchcraft occurred in surrounding counties as well. Nineteen of the accused, fourteen women and five men, were hanged at Gallows Hill near Salem Village. Hysteria had swept throughRead MoreThe Hysteria Of The Salem Witch Trials1366 Words   |  6 PagesWalter Kirn, an American novelist and literary critic, stated that ‘‘Everyone loves a witch hunt as long as it’s someone else’s witch being hunted.’’ (Web. Walter Kirn Quote) Although the Salem Witch Trials took place over 300 years ago, in 1692, and we claim that we have come a long way since then, the truth is we have not. The hysteria that took place during the witch trials occurred because people refused t o take responsibility for their actions. The same thing is happening in modern day AmericaRead MoreSalem Witch Trials975 Words   |  4 Pagespeople of Salem, Massachusetts, however they struggled to do so. Salem faced a major change as a result of the Puritan ambition. Because of their thought on the ideal community as a straitlaced society, those who portrayed an imperfect model were to be isolated. Suspicion flooded the holy Puritan town, and led to accusations of innocent people. After a close analysis, it may be relevant to look at the Puritan belief system as a possible catalyst for the events that occurred during the Salem witch trialsRead MoreThe Salem Witch Trials Essay1369 Words   |  6 PagesThe Salem Witch Trials The witch trials of the late 1600s were full of controversy and uncertainty. The Puritan town of Salem was home to most of these trials, and became the center of much attention in 1692. More than a hundred innocent people were found guilty of practicing witchcraft during these times, and our American government forced over a dozen to pay with their lives. The main reasons why the witch trials occurred were conflicts dealing with politics, religion, family, economicsRead MoreSuperstition, Panic, And Rumor1042 Words   |  5 Pagesspurred by religious zeal. While the actual trials may have only lasted for less than a year, Salem was indeed previously entrapped in a dangerous illusion of their own making for decades. Such as the nature of superstition and rumor, they curate an atmosphere of distrust, breeding paranoia because they are puzzles waiting to be fully realized. If they are not, then the paranoia only festers into madness and panic—growing anxiety. The divided colon y of Salem devolves into a dramatic opera of fabrications

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Ethical issues in counseling Practice Essay - 775 Words

Ethical issues In Counseling Practice Ethics are a vital component of Counseling. It helps keep Professional Counselors accountable to their clients, and to the state board. Let’s first start with the definition of ethics† Are guidelines or rules set by a governing body or society.. Ethics are important because it helps the Counselor think in reference of how well can he or she perform their duties. Ethics have many reasons to exists in counseling, Here are 5 important reasons.1) to enable the association and current members to know the ethical responsibility held in common by its members, 2) Code of Ethics help support†¦show more content†¦The ethical issue of the assessment process is the failure to not take into account the cultural and ethical differences in behaviors. The DSM 4 states being aware of the unintentional bias, but does not do a good job in distinguishing various cultures , ethnicities , while indentifying erroneous or defiant behavior that may not be accepted or known i n western culture.2 Another Ethical issue is EBP, or evidence based practice. EBP is the accumulation of the best available research from clinical experts that consist of client’s characteristics, cultures and preferences. The challenge and or issue with EBP is that some clinical experts think psychological assessment and treatment is strongly driven by financial gain and reputation. So when dealing with insurance companies the need to save money is being place above the need to treat. Not all client come to treatment with a clearly defined disorder and they do not fit into a â€Å"cookie-cutter model† EBP. It may be effective for counselors who work with clients with specific issues like depression, cognitive, and behavior disorders. But EBP does not offer a good deal for client who want to have more meaning, and fulfillment in their lives.3 Multiple or dual relationships can pose ethical issues in counseling. Dual and multiple relationships is when a counselor c arries a role of a teacher/therapist, or a supervisor/therapist. There are many ways to have unethical relationships other than the obvious sexual and emotionalShow MoreRelatedCounselor Interview : Counselor, Licensed Marriage And Family Therapist, And Licensed Clinical Alcohol And Drug Counselor Essay884 Words   |  4 Pageshas a private practice. CMB has been a counselor for over twenty years and has experienced a number of different ethical dilemmas over time. Through this interview, the counselor discussed a specific ethical issue she faced and how she handled the situation. The Ethical Dilemma To begin, the counselor described her client and the ethical dilemma that took place. CMB was seeing her client, a 36-year-old white woman, for one and a half years. The client’s reason for attending counseling was to workRead MoreEthics and Licensed Professional Counselor1175 Words   |  5 Pagesthe agency has asked Barbara to develop a counseling group to serve the needs of these individuals. a. What ethical matters should Barbara consider as she plans this group?Probably the most familiar of ethical issues , is the expectation that communications and information from participants in the course of this community program (including conversations, written or taped records, notes, test results, etc.) will be kept confidential. Because ethical issues are not always cut and dried, community programsRead MoreLegal Ethical Issues with Advertising and Online Counseling1385 Words   |  6 Pagesthe field of counseling, phones, fax machines, copiers, and computers are all used to run everyday operations and transfer information. Despite how great technology can be, ethical issues can arise because of it. For example, talking on the phone with a client in a crisis situation can create a condition in which confidentiality can be breeched. (McMinn, 1999). One new way in which technology has been used to extend the services of the counseling field is through online counseling. According toRead MoreEthical Issues Associated Within The Clinical Counseling Profession Essay1580 Words   |  7 Pagesencompasses ethical issues associated within the Clinical counseling profession. There will be at least four of the nine sections of the ACA Code of Ethics that will be covered within the context of this case. In consideration of each of these ethical breaches there will be dialog on the nature of the ethical issue or violation, where the ACA ethical code applies, ramifications of the ethical issue or violation of both parties, and with supplementary support of Kitchener?s five primary ethical principlesRead MorePersonal Reflection On My Personal Philosophy1329 Words   |  6 Pagesreflect on how my experiences in life influenced my personal ethical development. By reflecting on my life experiences, I will explore how my upbringing, and my faith influenced my morals and values. This paper will also explore ethical issues in counseling, and ethical codes used to resolve the issues. In addition, this paper I will reflect how this course has changed me in certain aspects regarding ethics and legal obligations in counseling. Section I 1) Family influences My parents have definitelyRead MoreEthics And Code Of Ethics1359 Words   |  6 Pagesversions of ethical codes in which it is useful to become aware of these differences for your future employment in working with a variety of professionals. Future coworkers may have different views and opinions however, a code of ethics will individualize these professionals and set standards. By making yourself aware of the differences, communication can become easier between employees of various backgrounds. Two particular organizations to compare may include the American Counseling AssociationRead MoreThe Codes Of Ethics Of The American Counseling Association1667 Words   |  7 Pagesof ethics of the American Counseling Association (ACA), American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), and National Association of Social Workers (NASW). ACA Code of Ethics The ACA is an educational, scientific, and professional organization that works to accomplish improved mental health, wellness, awareness, and education. The ACA establishes a code of ethics to provide guidance on ethical practices for professional counselors. The code explains ethical responsibilities and expectationsRead MoreThe Ethical Issues Raised When Services Are Delivered For Non Office, Off Site Settings Essay1160 Words   |  5 PagesIssues Raised When Services are Delivered in Non-Office, Off-Site Settings Anthony M Luciano Tanya M Giglio Mercy College In this paper, we will illustrate the issues that present when providing counseling in a non-office, off-site setting. We will explore two different kinds of counseling that occur in a space that is not a traditional office including in-home counseling and the rise of wilderness programs. These two modalities both have a limited amount of research on their efficacy andRead MoreIntroducing The Internet Into The Therapeutic Relationship1366 Words   |  6 Pagesthe internet? From homework assignments and assessments, using technology can be an opportunity. On the obstacle side, online counseling provides complex and unique ethical concerns from the clinician’s perception, particularly as it relates to couples counseling. What is online counseling? What ethical issues do practicing MFTs perceive regarding online counseling to couples? Web-based Couples Therapy Interventions Though internet-based interventions for couples are available as preventativeRead MoreWhat Does Diversity Do With Ethics?1075 Words   |  5 Pagesquestions may arise for the first-year counseling student. These inquiries may be broad or rather specific. Primarily, one may wonder if the topic of diversity itself is such a significant subject that it is outlined in a code of ethics. Secondarily, if diversity is addressed, is it treated as a singular subject or broadly covered under an umbrella of principles? Consequently, every student should strive to understand how professionals best respond to the range of issues involving diversity. One may retort